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How to Fix “Your Connection is Not Private” Error in Google Chrome


If you’ve just come across the “your connection is not private” error message on your screen, there’s no need to panic.
This is a common issue most Google Chrome users experience. Fortunately, you can fix this private connection error instantly.
Let’s understand why this error occurs and how to fix it.
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What is "Your Connection is not private Error"

“Your Connection Is Not Private Error” is a message from Google Chrome which prevents you from visiting a site as its certification can’t be validated. Eventually, the chrome browser stops you from gaining access to the website because the SSL certificates cannot be confirmed.

Why does your connection is not private error appear?

This error indicates that Google Chrome is stopping you from visiting an untrustworthy website. What this means is that your browser notices a problem while creating an SSL connection, or is unable to verify the website’s SSL certificate.

When the browser can’t verify the SSL certificate of a website, this is when the error message will appear on the screen. To understand further, you need to know what SSL is.

What is SSL?

SSL stands for Secure Socket Layer. It is created to secure your online data. SSL encryption secures your online data by preventing hackers from viewing and stealing users’ private data: name, address, or credit card number.

google privacy error

How does this work? When you type in a web address on Google’s search bar, in the background, Google Chrome sends a request to the respective server asking for the website.

If the requested website uses HTTPS, your browser will automatically scan whether there is an SSL certificate or not. Then, the certificate is checked to make sure it fits the privacy standard.

By default, Google Chrome will instantly stop you from accessing the website if its SSL certificate isn’t valid. It’ll display the error message “your connection is not private” on your screen.

Apart from a lack of an SSL certificate, there are numerous reasons why your internet connection might not be private. Regardless, you should clear the SSL state in Chrome on Windows through these steps:

  1. Click the Google Chrome – three dot icon on the top right, and then click Settings.
  2. Click Show Advanced Settings.
  3. Under Network, click Change proxy settings.
  4. Click the Content tab.
  5. Click “Clear SSL state”, and then click OK.
  6. Restart Chrome.

How to fix your connection is not private error in Chrome

While an invalid SSL certificate is usually the issue, here are some ways you can fix your connection is not private error in Chrome.

  • Reload the Page

    Sometimes reloading the page can fix minor issues. It could be that the SSL certificate is being reissued, or maybe that your browser failed to send the request to the server.

  • Don’t use Public Wi-Fi

    When you’re using a public network like the mall’s Wi-Fi, cafe or an airport, you are more likely to get this. The reason is that public Wi-Fi networks usually run on HTTP and the online content you are trying to access might not be encrypted. Use a VPN on Public hotspots.

    Learn how to stay safe on Public Wifi.

  • Clear your browser’s cache, cookies, and browser’s history

    Make a habit of clearing your browser’s cache and cookies from getting overloaded. Follow the steps to clear browser cache from Google Chrome:

    • Click the three dots in the top right of Google Chrome window
    • Click More Tools
    • Click Clear Browsing Data from the submenu
    • Check the boxes near Browsing history and Cached image and files
    • Hit the Clear data button to finish the step

    Get to know about what are Super Cookies.

  • Try Incognito Mode

    Use Google Chrome’s incognito window to see if the page is opening without any cookies, or browsing history.

  • google chrome privacy error
  • Verify your device’s date and time

    Browsers rely on your device’s date and time to verify the SSL certificate’s validity. You may experience Google Chrome’s “your connection is not private” error due to incorrect date and time. Correcting your date and time can fix the problem.

  • Check antivirus software

    An active antivirus can block SSL certifications from being verified. To fix this error, you’ll need to turn off your antivirus and see if the error message doesn’t appear again.

  • privacy error google chrome
  • Manually proceed with an unsafe connection (not recommended)

    While the error prevents you from visiting the website, you can process to the website at your own risk. To do so, you’ll have to follow the manual method: click Advanced > Proceed to the website. You’ll find this at the bottom of your screen.

  • Ignore the SSL certificate error from the Google Chrome Shortcut (not advised)

    The error message can be switched off temporarily. By ignoring the SSL certificate error message, you will only put the warning in silent mode.

    To use this method, follow the steps below:

    • Right-click Google Chrome shortcut on your desktop
    • Click Properties
    • In the Target field, add –ignore-certificate-errors
    • Click OK
    • If the error code NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID appears, bypass the error code by clicking Proceed.
    • Revisit the website and now the error will disappear
  • Expert’s Advice

    You can manually switch off the error message. However, that opens a new array of risks altogether. The best possible solution to secure your internet connection is to have AES 256-bit encryption backing up your online activities.

    By using encryption, you can rest assured about your digital existence as it keeps you secure against cyberattacks and malicious actors who are actively trying to exploit you.